research

A&S K Week Video

Get Involved, Experience and Explore the possibilities A&S offers at the University of Kentucky!

American Female Professor Came Across the Ocean to “Water” the Desert Plants in Xinjiang

Biology Professor Carol Baskin recently received the Tiashan Award from the Xinjiang government for her contributions to the study of the ecology of desert plant seed.

From the Middle East to Middle America

A new book by UK sociologist Nora Rosie Moosnick from University Press of Kentucky explores how Jewish and Arab immigrants' experiences in Kentucky have more similarities than differences.

Undergraduate Research at UK with Zaheen Rabbani

Zaheen Rabbani graduated from the University of Kentucky in May 2012 with dual degrees in biology and psychology. Zaheen credits his undergraduate research experience with developing critical thinking skills and prepping him to apply to medical school this fall.

"I probably learned more doing undergraduate research than I would have in a textbook. I’ve learned how processes work. It’s a different mindset. It allows you to think critically and that will definitely help in my future career. I’m going to apply to medical school in the fall. I hope to do research there as well.

"I’ve always been interested in research. That was actually one of my main reasons why I chose this university is because of its research focus," Zaheen says.

He started working in Physiology Chair Michael Reid's lab as part of a Bio 395 course, which gives undergrads credit hours for conducting research. "Patients who undergo a lot of chemotherapy report losses in muscle function. So my research focused on what treatment options are available, and the main goal was to prevent muscle atrophy.

"I think that most people are terrified at the thought of reaching out to faculty members and saying, 'Hey, I want to do research. What can I do to contribute to your lab?' You’d be surprised how many faculty members will welcome you with open arms and cause they’re always looking for somebody to take under their wing and mentor."

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Taylor Lloyd

University of Kentucky senior Taylor Lloyd got involved in research as a freshman, and she says it shaped her career path. In February 2012, Taylor was honored on the floor of Rupp Arena as a recipient of two prestigious scholarships: the NASA Astronaut Scholarship and the Goldwater Scholarship. Her research, in the lab of Bruce Downie (associate professor of horticulture at the UK College of Agriculture), focuses on light and temperature signals that govern the germination of seeds. Understanding these mechanisms will allow researchers to improve agriculture in light of rising global temperatures.

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications), additional footage from UK Athletics

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Gareth Voss (Part 2)

Gareth ("Gary") Voss came to the University of Kentucky to do research on the regenerative abilities of salamanders as a sophomore in high school. Now a freshman at UK, Gary has conducted research that resulted in two papers. "They're very good papers," says his UK mentor Dr. Randal Voss. "We're not just talking about a couple of throw-away papers to 'Ranger Rick' journal. We're sending these papers to the top journals in the United States.

"It really is a coup for UK when we can get our top local talent to stay in state. Gary's a National Merit Scholar, and he could have gone to any university he wanted to, but he chose to come to UK."

To learn more about Dr. Voss' lab, visit ambystoma.org/

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Undergraduate Research at UK with Gareth Voss (Part 1)

As a Paul Laurence Dunbar High School student, Gareth ("Gary") Voss came to the University of Kentucky to do research on the regenerative abilities of salamanders in Dr. Randal Voss's lab. Gary says, "At Dunbar in the Math-Science program, we have to join a faculty member at UK for a research project by the beginning of our junior year. And I heard about a professor at UK, who shared the same last name and the same first name, more or less, as my dad and his name is Randall Voss and he studies salamanders and regeneration.Things kind of clicked and I’ve been there ever since."

Gary's high-school project focused on tail regeneration. He notes, "I was not allowed to do any of the surgeries to remove the tails, but I was able to do the data analysis on the tails, and do a lot of interesting things in studying the regeneration of the salamanders."

Gary is now a freshman at UK majoring in biology and chemistry, and he says getting started early in research is really an advantage. "Getting started early gets you exposed to all the things you need to know. I was exposed to more things in genetics than most people my age would have been. Working in the lab not only puts you on the cutting edge of research and science, but it also lets you see all the things your classes are talking about in person, and to a greater extent."

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

For more information on Dr. Voss' lab, please visit ambystoma.org/

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

SPUR and the Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars at UK

If you are an undergraduate doing a research project at the University of Kentucky, you can register for the Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars online at uky.edu/UGResearch/showcase.html by April 6, 2012.

The Society for the Promotion of Undergraduate Research (SPUR) hosts the Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars each spring. On April 25 from 4-7 p.m., the showcase will feature poster, oral and table presentations at the UK Student Center.

Guest speaker Sam Nicaise graduated from UK in 2010 and is currently doing nanotech research at MIT. As an undergrad, Sam led the UK solar car team. Come hear how his undergrad research experience prepared him for graduate work.

For more information, visit SPUR's homepage: uky.edu/UGResearch/SPUR.html

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Geologic Mapping at the University of Kentucky

On December 1, 2011, the Kentucky Geological Survey at the University of Kentucky celebrated a major achievement in the mapping of Kentucky's geology. KGS has published all 25 maps in the 30 by 60 minute geologic map series (1:100,000 scale), making them available for free to the public on their website and through a new app.

This achievement is unparalleled by any other state, making Kentucky a leader in geologic mapping and map technology.

These detailed maps show surface and subsurface rock types, formations, and structures such as faults. Geologic formations and faults control the occurrence of minerals and fuels, groundwater, and geologic hazards.

"They are an important contribution to society because the information they provide assists in the production of resources, protection of groundwater and the environment, stability of foundations and infrastructure, and avoidance of hazards," says KGS Director and State Geologist Jim Cobb. "Because the maps are available on the Web, they are always accessible to the public at no cost. Hardcopy versions of the maps can be ordered from the Survey's Publication Sales Office."

At a news conference on campus, a super-sized geologic map of Kentucky, 10 feet high by 23 feet wide, was unveiled in the foyer of the Mining and Mineral Resources Building on campus. A symposium on geologic mapping, "Celebrating Geologic Mapping for Science and Society," was held later that day at the Boone Center and featured experts from the University of Kentucky, KGS and other state surveys, the United States Geological Survey, and academic institutions.

KGS also announced a new mapping application available to the public. Smartphone and tablet users can explore the geology of Kentucky in their vicinity by using this new Web-based app for mobile devices. This requires available GPS to pinpoint their location and data access to download the map layers. If users direct their device browsers to the KGS GeoMobile site at kgs.uky.edu/kgsmap/mobile/kgsgeoserver, they can see the geologic formations and a number of other features found at the KGS geologic mapping site.

All of these maps and mapping resources are a product of the Kentucky Geological Survey and the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey which provides annual funding for such mapping. Also significant was another geologic mapping partnership between the Kentucky Geological Survey and the USGS from 1960 to 1980 that produced the original geologic maps that laid the framework for this series. The new map series is a testament to the work that can be accomplished through federal-state-university partnerships.

On a GPS-enabled device, browse to the KGS GeoMobile site at kgs.uky.edu/kgsmap/mobile/kgsgeoserver. You can choose to view geologic formations like water wells and springs, sinkholes, coal beds, and oil and gas wells. A map of Kentucky showing the 30 x 60 minute geologic maps can be found on the KGS website at uky.edu/KGS/mapping/100k.htm.

A full-size version of each map can be found through the KGS publication search page at kgs.uky.edu/kgsweb/PubsSearching/PubsSimpleSearch.asp.

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars at UK

When undergrads get involved in research, they’re more likely to stay at their university, enjoy their courses, and find career success. The University of Kentucky fosters research experiences through the Office of Undergraduate Research, and the student-run Society for the Promotion of Undergraduate Research. Each spring these groups host a showcase that allows students to demonstrate what they’ve learned and communicate why it’s important. In April 2012, 198 students shared their discoveries through poster, oral and table presentations. Hear what a few of these students, and their faculty mentors, had to say about why undergraduate research is important.

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications), interviewing by Karin Pekarchik (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

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