UK

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Sylvester Kiger

Excerpt, "House Key"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Mozella Y. Harris

Excerpt, "Wisdom"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Dorothy Coleman

Excerpt, "Generations"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

For more information visit: anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Betty Knott

Excerpt, "Childhood"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

For more information visit: anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Kenneth Demus

Excerpt, "Everything we needed"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Larry Kooper

Excerpt, "Memories"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

For more information visit: anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

Why Jewish Studies?

Why Jewish Studies? Students of the University of Kentucky share their experiences and discuss the opportunities a Jewish Studies minor can offer.

 

 

Tracy Campbell Discusses History of St. Louis Gateway Arch

UK History professor and Pulitzer Prize nominated author Tracy A. Campbell's latest book, "The Gateway Arch: A Biography," explores the political and economic history of St. Louis and the origins of the city's most recognized structure. Campbell also serves as co-director of UK's Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit uky.edu/UKNow. A direct link to this - uknow.uky.edu/content/campbells-new-book-explores-complex-history-st-louis-gateway-arch

For more information on Tracy Campbell and UK's Department of History visit: history.as.uky.edu/

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UK