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Chemistry Event

Department of Chemistry Regional Undergraduate Poster Competition

UK Department of Chemistry Regional Undergraduate Poster Competition

Jacobs Science Building - Second and Third floors (check-in located in JSB 261M)

The Department of Chemistry at the University of Kentucky will hold its annual Regional Poster Session for Undergraduates on Friday, March 31, 2023. Come participate in this opportunity to share your research and network with other undergraduate researchers in the region. There is no registration fee!

Abstracts are due by Friday, March 17, 2023. To submit an abstract and register, click here.

To view a copy of this year's abstract booklet, click here.

Note to UK students: Students in CHE 395 planning to graduate or otherwise conclude their research are required to participate in the Poster Competition if they have not done so in the past.

Please contact the department if you have questions.

Awards

First Prize $300
Second Prize $200
Honorable Mention 3 @ $100 each

Past winners include students from:

Asbury University
Ball State University
Belmont University
Berea College
Centre College
Indiana State University
Indiana University
Indiana University Kokomo
Marshall University
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Transylvania University
University of Kentucky
Western Kentucky University

 

We thank the Lexington Section of the American Chemical Society for graciously funding the awards for this poster competition.

Archives

Date:
-
Location:
Jacobs Science Building

Regional Undergraduate Poster Competition

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK Department of Chemistry Regional Undergraduate Poster Compeition
Jacobs Science Building - Atrium (check-in located in JSB 261M)

To comply with University of Kentucky COVID-19 protocols, all presenters and attendees are required to wear masks during the competition.

The Department of Chemistry at the University of Kentucky will hold its annual Regional Poster Session for Undergraduates on Friday, April 15, 2022.  The 2022 competition format is scheduled to be in-person. Come participate in this opportunity to share your research and network with other undergraduate researchers in the region. There is no registration fee!

Abstracts are due by March 25, 2022 at 5pm. To submit an abstract and register, click here.

To view a copy of last year's abstract booklet, click here.

Note to UK students: Students in CHE 395 planning to graduate or otherwise conclude their research are required to participate in the Poster Session if they have not done so in the past.

Schedule of Events
11:30am-12:00pm
Check-in and set up posters
Jacobs Science Building (JSB), Room 261M
Posters should remain on display 12:00pm-3:00pm
12:00pm-1:30pm
Group A Presents
Posters located on the first and second floors of JSB
1:30pm-3:00pm
Group B Presents
Posters located on the first and second floors of JSB
3:00pm-3:30pm Networking Break
3:30pm
Awards Ceremony
Jacobs Science Building (JSB), Room 261M

The poster size should be limited to 4 feet wide and 5.5 feet tall. 

The 2022 Undergraduate Poster Competition will take place in the hallways of the Jacobs Science Building.  You will each have assigned areas on a wall-mounted rail system to hang posters.  Simply find your name and insert the poster nearby.  Please be aware, thumbtacks are prohibited.  Tape deemed appropriate for the walls will be available to secure the corners of the poster.

Awards
First Prize $300
Second Prize $200
Honorable Mention 3 @ $100 each

Recent winners include students from:

Asbury University
Belmont University
Berea College
Centre College
Indiana State University
Indiana University
Indiana University Kokomo
Marshall University
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Transylvania University
University of Kentucky
Western Kentucky University
 

We thank the Lexington Section of the American Chemical Society for graciously funding the awards for this poster session.

Please contact the department if you have questions.

 

Date:
-
Location:
Jacobs Science Building

Inaugural Susan A. Odom Lecture

This lecture series commemorates the life and legacy of Professor Susan Odom, an energetic, productive, and driven faculty member in the Department of Chemistry from 2011 to 2021. It features speakers noted for outstanding research in Professor Odom’s fields of synthetic and materials chemistry.

Visit this page for more information on the Susan A. Odom lecture series.


Jodie L. Lutkenhaus

Bio: Jodie L. Lutkenhaus is holder of the Axalta Chair and Professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University. Lutkenhaus received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin and her Ph.D in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Current research areas include polyelectrolytes, redox-active polymers, energy storage, and composites. She has received recognitions including World Economic Forum Young Scientist, Kavli Fellow, NSF CAREER, AFOSR Young Investigator, 3M Non-tenured Faculty Award. She is the past-Chair of the AICHE Materials Engineering & Sciences Division. Lutkenhaus is the Deputy Editor of ACS Applied Polymer Materials and a member of the U.S. National Academies Board of Chemical Sciences & Technology. 

 

"Redox-active Macromolecular Radicals for Metal-Free, Degradable Batteries"

Abstract: Because of the projected shortages of elements used in Li-ion batteries and limited battery recycling, alternative electrode chemistries are gaining interest. Ideally, this future battery would contain materials that are easily sourced with little environmental impact, would be degradable of recyclable, and would bear similar or better energy storage characteristics in comparison to Li-ion batteries. This talk will examine one such promising battery chemistry, that of macromolecular radicals. These polymers generally contain redox-active nitroxide radical groups that reversibly exchange electrons at rates much higher that of current metal oxide cathodes. This manifests as a higher power or a high charging rate. The current challenges for macromolecular radical batteries are to understand the redox mechanism, to increase the energy density in metal-free or aqueous conditions, and to consider a circular life cycle. Insight into the polymer’s redox mechanism is provided using electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, in which mixed electron-ion-solvent transfer is quantified. This knowledge reveals why certain metal-free, aqueous electrolytes are well-suited to this polymer class. Last, an organic peptide battery that degrades on command into amino acids and byproducts provides a path forward toward recycling for a circular life cycle. Collaborative work on polypeptide redox flow batteries with the late Susan Odom is highlighted.

 

Date:
-
Location:
WT Young Library Auditorium
Event Series:
47th Annual Naff Symposium ech275

Innovation in Molecular Neuroscience

Schedule of Events - April 1, 2022

8:00am

Registration and Continental Breakfast
WT Young Library Gallery

8:50am

Welcome - TBD

9:00am

Dr. Erin Calipari
"A novel mechanism for hormonal regulation of reward circuits in the brain contributes to addiction vulnerability in females"

10:00am

Break
WT Young Library Gallery

10:30am

Dr. Tim Harris
"High capacity electrophysiology: How we got here and where we can go"

11:30am

Lunch & Break

1:00pm

Dr. Elizabeth Hillman
"Understanding the brain with high-speed 3D imaging of cell structure, function and identity"

2:00pm

Break & Poster Session Set-Up
WT Young Library Gallery; Jacobs Science Building, Atrium

2:30pm

Dr. Baljit Khakh
"Cells that tile your brain: Astrocyte roles in neural circuits"

3:30 - 5:00pm

Poster Session
Jacobs Science Building, Atrium

 

Speakers

Dr. Erin Calipari

Vanderbilt University

Dr. Calipari received her PhD in Neuroscience in 2013 in the laboratory of Dr. Sara Jones at Wake Forest University School of Medicine where she studied how self-administered drugs altered dopaminergic function to drive addictive behaviors. She then went on to complete her postdoctoral training with Dr. Eric Nestler at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where she used circuit probing techniques to understand the temporally specific neural signals that underlie motivation and reward learning. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Pharmacology. Her independent work seeks to characterize and modulate the precise circuits in the brain that underlie both adaptive and maladaptive processes in reward, motivation, and associative learning.

Group Page

Dr. Tim Harris

Johns Hopkins University

Timothy Harris is a research professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He leads the Applied Physics and Instrumentation Group at the HHMI Janelia Research Campus, and is the originator of the project that produced the Neuropixels Si probe for extracellular recording in animals, mostly mice, and rats. He shares his time between Janelia and Johns Hopkins and is working on projects to enable recording 10-20,000 neurons in rodents and 30-50,000 neurons in non-human primates, as well as stimulate with high resolution.

He received a BS in Chemistry at California Polytechnical State University, San Luis Obispo, and a PhD in Analytical Chemistry at Purdue University.

Group Page

Dr. Elizabeth Hillman

Columbia University

Elizabeth Hillman is professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia University and a member of the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and Kavli Institute for Brain Science at Columbia. Hillman received her undergraduate degree in physics and Ph.D. in medical physics and bioengineering at University College London and completed post-doctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. In 2006, Hillman moved to Columbia University, founding the Laboratory for Functional Optical Imaging. Hillman’s research program focuses on the development and application of optical imaging and microscopy technologies to capture functional dynamics in the living brain. Most recently, she developed swept confocally aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy, a technique capable of very high speed volumetric imaging of neural activity in behaving organisms such as adult and larval Drosophila, zebrafish, C. elegans and the rodent brain. Hillman’s research program also includes exploring the interrelation between neural activity and blood flow in the brain, as the basis for signals detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Hillman is a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), the society of photo-optical instrumentation (SPIE) and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). She has received the OSA Adolf Lomb Medal for contributions to optics, as well as early career awards from the Wallace Coulter Foundation, National Science Foundation and Human Frontier Science Program.

Group Page

Dr. Baljit Khakh

University of California, Los Angeles

Baljit Khakh completed his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge in the laboratory of Patrick PA Humphrey. He completed postdoctoral fellowships in the laboratory of Graeme Henderson at the University of Bristol, and then in the laboratory of Henry A. Lester and Norman Davidson at California Institute of Technology. In 2001, Khakh became Group Leader at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, and in 2006 he moved to the University of California, Los Angeles where he is Professor of Physiology and Neurobiology. Khakh’s work has been recognized, including with the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, the Paul G. Allen Distinguished Investigator Award, and the Outstanding Investigator Award (R35) from NINDS.

Group Page


2022 Naff Symposium Committee

Dr. Chris Richards - Chair

Jason DeRouchey (Chemistry)
Lance Johnson (Physiology)
Brandon Henderson (Marshall University)

 

 

Date:
-
Location:
WT Young Library Auditorium
Tags/Keywords:

Graduation Celebration

Although the COVID-19 response has cancelled this event, we would like to recognize the following graduates as well as our awards and scholarships recipients.

Doctor of Philosophy

Shardrack Asare

Rosemary Calabro

Catherine Denning

Shi Li

Xiaojia Ren

Travis Schuyler

Bin Sun

Shanshan Wang

Yuchen Zhang

Master of Science

Iris Begum

Mason Daniel

Tracy Gastineau

Walker Mask

Mehak Sachdeva








 

Bachelor of Arts

Anne Abell*

Ebubechi Adindu*

Emily Butler*

Ayla Deck*

Deanna DeHoff

Blair Dever

Ryan Freer

Rachel Hammer

Lance Johnson

Hunter Maxwell*

Hannah Newberry*

Madison Prieto

Cody Robinette*

Trinity Rudd

Muna Shakhashiro*

Maria Shamai

Madeline Szubert*

Emma Vallee*

Madison Von Deylen*

Mahala Walker*

Phillip Woolery

*Denotes Chemistry Department Honors

Bachelor of Science

Charles Beasley

Danielle Berkowitz*

Brooke Brundage

Elizabeth Caudill*

Haley Coleman

James Coogle

Katherine Cotter*

Andrew Dunbar*

Bryce Elliott*

Luke Fish

Alexis Flynn

Stephen Goodlet*

Heba Hanbali

Angela Jones*

Emily Meredith

Martha Mortell

Christian Powell

Christopher Stanford*

Coron Tsurara

*Denotes Chemistry Department Honors

 

 

 


 

Undergraduate Scholarships (2020-2021)
Thomas B. Nantz Scholarship Bailey Chandler
Paul G. Sears Chemistry Scholarship Reilly Cochran
Paul G. Sears Chemistry Scholarship Lauren Osias
Paul G. Sears Chemistry Scholarship Claire Scott
Robert M. Boyer Memorial Scholarship April Collins
David W. and Eloise C. Young Scholarship Anna Fatta
David W. and Eloise C. Young Scholarship Amanda Shaw
Robert Singleton Hart 1907 Scholarship Allison Segard
Paul L. Corio Scholarship Tyler Vogel
Dr. Hume and Ellen Towle Bedford Scholarship Matthew Farmer
ACS-Hach Land Grant Scholarship Sydney Sheldon
ACS-Hach Land Grant Scholarship Brandon Cooke
Scholarships (2019-2020)
Wilbur L. Price Undergraduate Scholarship Jenna Rector (Fall 2019)
Wilbur L. Price Undergraduate Scholarship Lenvel Perry III (Fall 2019)
Murrill Graduate Fellowship Kyle Baustert

 

Graduate Awards (2019-2020)
100% Plus Taylor Varner
100% Plus Alexandra Riddle
Fast Start Nadeesha Kothalawala
Outstanding Graduate Research Tyler Mertens
Outstanding TA Kanthi Nuti
Outstanding TA Vinayak Bhat
Outstanding General Chemistry TA Al  Masud Abdullah
Outstanding General Chemistry TA Keerthan Rao
Undergradute Awards (2019-2020)
General Chemistry Excellence Award Ben You
General Chemistry Excellence Award (Fall 2019 - CHE105) Danielle Dutton
General Chemistry Excellence Award (Fall 2019 - CHE107) Tongxin Wang
General Chemistry Excellence Award (Spring 2020 - CHE105) Austin King
General Chemistry Excellence Award (Spring 2020 - CHE107) Rebecca Ahn
Freshman Chemistry Award Ashley Bates
Hammond Leadership Award Angela Jones
Willard R. Meredith Memorial Award Lauren Seeger
Nancy J. Stafford Award Christopher Stanford
Hammond Undergraduate Service Award Ebubechi Adindu
Hammond Undergraduate Service Award JT Coogle

 

Date:
Location:
n/a
Event Series:

Dawson Lecture: New Synthetic Methods for C-F Bond Formation: From Fundamental Science to Applications

This presentation will describe our group's recent advances in developing metal-mediated/catalyzed methods for introducing fluorine into organic molecules. Our efforts into this area are guided by detailed fundamental studies of stoichiometric organometallic bond-forming reactions. These fundamental studies will be described in detail, and their translation to practical applications (particularly in the context of the synthesis of PET imaging agents) will be discussed.

 

                                                       Dr. Melanie Sanford

 

Dr. Melanie SanfordMelanie S. Sanford is currently the Moses Gomberg Distingished University Professor of Chemistry and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees at Yale University in 1996 where she carried out undergraduate research in the laboratory of Professor Robert Crabtree. She pursued graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology working with Professor Robert Grubbs. Following postdoctoral work at Princeton University with Professor John Groves, she joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in the summer of 2003 as an Assistant Professor of chemistry. She was promoted to associate professor in 2007, to full professor in 2010, to Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemistry in 2011, and to Moses Gomberg Collegiate Professor of Chemistry in 2012. She has won a number of awards, including the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, the Sackler Prize, the Blavatnik Award, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the ACS. Research in the Sanford group aims to develop new chemical reactions that enable the production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and fuels in a more efficient and environmentally friendly manner. 

 

Date:
-
Location:
W.T. Young Library Auditorium
Event Series:
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